Treating gum disease may help manage Type 2 diabetes, Diabetes UK study finds

Treating gum disease may help manage Type 2 diabetes, Diabetes UK study finds

  • Intensive treatment for gum disease improved blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes
  • Treating oral health also linked to improvements in kidney and blood vessel function
  • Researchers hope this could provide a new way of helping people with Type 2 diabetes manage their condition

A study funded by Diabetes UK has found that treating periodontitis (gum disease) could help people with Type 2 diabetes manage their blood glucose levels, and may reduce their risk of diabetes-related complications.

Researchers at the UCL Eastman Dental Institute recruited 264 people with Type 2 diabetes, all of whom had moderate to severe periodontitis. Half of the participants received intensive treatment for their gum disease, which involved deep cleaning their gums and minor gum surgery. The other half received standard care, involving regular cleaning and polishing of their teeth. The treatments were provided alongside any Type 2 diabetes medications being taken.

After 12 months, participants receiving the intensive treatment had reduced their blood glucose levels (HbA1c) by on average 0.6 per cent more than the standard care group. This suggests that intensive gum disease treatment could help some people with Type 2 diabetes to improve their blood glucose levels.

Gum disease affects almost half of the UK population and people with diabetes have a higher risk of developing it. Gum disease sets in when the levels of bacteria inside the mouth are out of balance, and it causes chronic inflammation inside the body. This inflammation has been linked to cardiovascular and kidney complications, as well as insulin resistance.

The findings, published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, are the first to link intensive gum disease treatment to improvements in kidney and blood vessel function and chronic inflammation. While more research is needed to explore this connection, the findings suggest that treatment may help to reduce the risk of serious diabetes-related complications, such as heart disease, stroke and kidney disease, in people with Type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also observed a link between the treatment and improved quality of life.

Professor Francesco D’Aiuto, lead researcher of the study, said: “Our findings suggest preventing and treating gum disease could potentially be a new and important way to help people with Type 2 diabetes manage their condition, and reduce their risk of its serious complications.

“The improvement in blood glucose control we observed, in people who received intensive treatment, is similar to the effect that’s seen when people with Type 2 diabetes are prescribed a second blood glucose lowering drug.

“We now need to determine if the improvements we found can be maintained in the longer-term and if they apply to everyone with Type 2 diabetes.”

Prof John Deanfield, senior investigator of the study at the UCL Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, said: “Inflammation may be part of the biological pathways that lead to several health conditions including diabetes, heart disease, dementia and cancer.  

“Our findings that reduction in periodontitis, which is a common cause of inflammation, improves vascular, renal as well as blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes, are exciting and could lead to new strategies to improve care. Large-scale clinical outcome trials should now be designed.”

Dr Elizabeth Robertson, Director of Research at Diabetes UK, said: “Currently people with Type 2 diabetes aren’t given oral health advice or treatment as part of their routine diabetes care.

“While more work is needed to fully understand how good oral health could help with blood glucose management, this research gives us important insights into the potential benefits of looking after your oral health if you have Type 2 diabetes.”

Diabetes UK is the largest funder of diabetes research in the UK, investing around £7 million every year to bring about life-changing breakthroughs in care, treatment and prevention, with the ultimate aim of bringing us closer to a cure.

To find out more about diabetes, visit www.diabetes.org.uk.

The project was also part-funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), via the UCLH Biomedical Research Centre, as part of a comprehensive new research programme in the field of Oral Health.




Editors Notes

 

Notes to editors

For further media information please contact Charlie Breslin in the Diabetes UK media relations team on 020 7424 1165 or email pressteam@diabetes.org.uk.

For urgent out of hours media enquiries only please call 07711 176 028. 

Post-embargo link to full paper on The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinologyhttp://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(18)30038-X/fulltext

 


CONTACT

BSDHT

enquiries@bsdht.org.uk

01788 575050

ABOUT BSDHT

The British Society of Dental Hygiene and Therapy (BSDHT) is a nationally recognised body that represents over 4,000 Dental Hygienists and Dental Therapists across the UK and beyond.

BSDHT maintain an on-going dialogue with the General Dental Council (GDC), the Departments of Health and all of the main groups representing dental care professionals, and attends meetings of the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for Dentistry, bringing dental hygiene and therapy to the attention of government ministers and MP’s.

Visit www.bsdht.org.uk for more information.

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